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Tueda Nature Reserve

After you've gone home , chamois, tétras-lyres (blackgrouse) will remain on to fight the cold and try to survive one more winter. Survival can be summerized in this simple concept: save energy.

Snow has covered the animals’ usual food. They can no longer find anything to eat and have to delve in their own reserves. If food becomes scarce, needs increase: moving about in the snow becomes more exhausting, cold and wind involve more calories to keep the body at its normal temperature. A movement induced by disturbances might be insignificant, but the global consequences of numerous disturbances will result in weakening the animals and reducing their chance of survival .

As for the trees, they grow slowly in altitude. So, even if they do not appear to be tall, imposing, they can well be 100 years old. The ski edges, snowshoes, ski-sticks, can very easily hurt barks, or shoots, hinder their growth and increase the danger of diseases .
The wood twig, which barely broke through the snow, might have been a future Arolla pine...

The nature reserve's regulations and , specifically, the ban on off-piste skiing apart from a few authorised itineraries, aim at preserving wildlife tranquillity and protecting the plants. At the threshold of the biggest skiing area in the world, this rather small area is dedicated to them, please respect it.

Please note : Dogs are banned in the nature reserve as well as in the Vanoise National Park (except, conditionally, alongside the Tueda lake, if kept on a lead).

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